Bossier officials provide update on second Red River flood

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Below is information gathered from Monday’s emergency preparedness briefing at the Bossier Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness:

  • Multi Agency Resource Center (MARC) activity Saturday at the Bossier Sheriff’s substation on Viking Drive handled inquiries on flood assistance from 13 families to and gave tetanus inoculations to approximately 30 individuals. MARC brought together relief agencies, volunteer organizations and corporate partners to assist individuals affected by the initial round of flooding.
  • Included in information distributed at the MARC was how to recognize and report scams, delivered by a representative of the Louisiana Attorney General. Additional MARC events will be held Tuesday, June 23 and Thursday, June 25 from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. at the Sheriff’s substation on Viking Drive. Another round of free tetanus shots will be issued Thursday, the 25th.
  • National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters say the Red River will crest again above flood stage by July 1, but the crest is expected to be well below the 37-plus foot flood wave that caused significant flooding in Bossier Parish. Predictions call for the Red to crest somewhere between 32 and 34 feet. Additional information is being collected and should be released Wednesday.
  • Heavy rains from Tropical Storm Bill have caused water in Lake Texoma to top out over the spillway and the Red is beginning to rise in Texas and Oklahoma. According to NWS forecasters, the flood wave should reach Shreveport around July 1.
  • Craig Ross, hydrologist for the NWS, said the channel capacity of the Red has been significantly reduced and cannot carry off the volume of water as in years past. Silting and bank collapse have contributed to the problem, he indicated. Ross said the flood stage figures of the Red may need to be adjusted.
  • Bossier Parish engineers are in the process of collecting data and reconstructing flood areas to determine which parts of the parish will be seriously impacted by a 32- or 34-foot crest in the Red River.