Coleman discusses development, growth in south Bossier

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Linc Coleman, CEO of U.L. Coleman Companies, was the guest speaker at the South Bossier Community Luncheon Wednesday. He discussed development needs that he envisions for south Bossier and a way for the community to get involved. (Stacey Tinsley/Press-Tribune)

By Stacey Tinsley, stinsley@bossierpress.com

A local developer discussed the prospect for development in south Bossier during a recent luncheon.

Linc Coleman, CEO of U.L. Coleman Companies, was the guest speaker at the South Bossier Community Luncheon Wednesday. He discussed development needs that he envisions for south Bossier and a way for the community to get involved.

Coleman’s vision is to establish a clear strategy to guide the redevelopment in south Bossier, including an open space network, trail connections, land uses, neighborhoods enhancements and riverfront improvements.

“The citizens of south Bossier need to take control of their area, as (do) the politicians that are there,” Coleman said. “South Bossier doesn’t want to be in second place. We can out do north Bossier. But it’s going to take everyone working together.”

Coleman would like to see venues for a diverse mix of people and businesses, enhanced neighborhood resources, venues for social gatherings, and strengthened existing residential and additional commercial options. 

Regarding economic development, Coleman would like to expand on the success of north Bossier and Shreveport as a regional destination, prioritize public-sector investment to re-brand the South Bossier Redevelopment District, and leverage public improvements to stimulate private sector investment.

“Citizens and business owners of south Bossier need to reach out to Bossier City and say that you want to see this type of growth and revitalization projects happen,” Coleman said. “This will be an ongoing process.”

As for recreation upgrades, Coleman would like to establish an open space network that connects the district with trails, and provide more destinations/recreational opportunities along the river and Increase habitat area/quality.

Stretching from Pecan Park to Southgate, the south Bossier Neighborhoods are primarily comprised of well-established, single-family homes along the eastern portion of Barksdale Boulevard. 

Within Coleman’s plan, it proposes improvements to the pedestrian, bicycle and open space network, enhancements to the neighborhood entries, and safe crossings at Barksdale Boulevard intersections.

The character of the properties along Barksdale Boulevard consists mainly of low-density, single-use buildings. 

The recommendations within his plan include preparing detailed development standards and design guidelines that can be adopted and enforced by Bossier City in order to create higher-density, mixed-use development, with buildings pushed closer to the pavements to create a more urban edge to the west side of the highway. 

The mixed-use district also takes advantage of a large undeveloped parcel north of the CenturyLink Center that can be developed into a desirable neighborhood with scenic views of the Red River.

Coleman says that he and his team are still in the process of evolving plans for Walker Place and that they will never give up.

“We are still in the process since our settlement (with the City of Bossier City),” Coleman said. “There is a lot of developments out there that have failed because they didn’t have that connectivity or the engagement of all the land uses. It takes everybody, whether it’s the neighborhoods, the city, the private sector for all of this to really happen.”

The South Bossier Community Group meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Shady Grove Recreational Center, 3949 Wayne Ave., Bossier City, from noon to 1 p.m. Lunch is catered and costs $5 per person.