Hanna: GOP’s Waterloo

1335

The now-famous video of Donald Trump making inappropriate comments about women should serve as a learning lesson for Republicans.

That is, no stone will be left unturned in order to stop any Republican whose candidacy is considered a threat to the natural order of things in Washington and beyond. That’s especially true if you’re a Republican whose mere presence in the race is an affront to the bosses in your own party.

Though the Republican nominee for president, Trump is no tried and true Republican. He’s more of an independent. His positions are more populist than anything else.

A disciplined candidate he is not, Trump seems to have a bad habit of speaking before he gives his statements much thought. Perhaps he does it on purpose. Perhaps that’s what makes him appealing to the tens of millions of Americans across the country who are supporting his presidential campaign. Perhaps that’s what attracts tens of thousands of people, young and old alike, to each and every Trump rally while Hillary Clinton struggles to assemble a few hundred at her campaign events.

sam-hannaWho knows?

As if it was orchestrated to some extent, Republican members of the Congress, including weak-kneed House Speaker Paul Ryan, quickly distanced themselves from Trump very shortly after the recording of Trump’s conversation about women was aired. That the video was leaked is irrelevant. That it was leaked by someone who now works for the NBC network is relevant.

If there’s one thing we’ve learned for sure about politics in the 21st century, it is the so-called mainstream media (MSM), by and large, works hand in hand with the Democratic Party to elect Democrats to public office. Wikileaks, through its acquisition of emails from the Democratic National Committee, the Clinton campaign and the Clinton Foundation, confirmed it.

Most recently, Wikileaks disclosed that staff members from the DNC and the Clinton campaign hosted an elaborate dinner for members of the press including reporters and opinion writers from The New York Times, NBC, MSNBC, USA Today (Gannett), The Washington Post, CBS, ABC, CNN and so on. Dinner goers, it seems, had an open discussion about Clinton’s “talking points” and steps the Clinton campaign planned to take as the presidential race unfolded.

For Republicans, this year’s presidential campaign is somewhat of a Waterloo.

If Trump somehow wins the race, the Republican establishment will be stuck with a president who was elected without their help. He’ll owe them nothing, and they’ll only have themselves to blame for turning their back on their nominee.

If Clinton is elected president, Republicans will move on and put plans in place for the 2020 presidential campaign. But they’ll have to do it without much help from the tens of millions of Americans who supported Trump.

After all, they supported Trump because they believed in his message. And it isn’t a Republican message.

Sam Hanna Jr. is publisher of The Ouachita Citizen, and he serves in an editorial/management capacity with The Concordia Sentinel and The Franklin Sun. He can be reached at samhannajr@samhannajr.com