History: A long cross-country drive

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The Bossier Banner issue of August 28, 1924 ran the following story. Imagine the scorching heat and the dust in your teeth as the journey proceeds.

“The coming of the automobile has not only brought about a change in our manner of travel and shortened the miles, but has fairly revolutionized our daily life. If the gasoline and tires—and pocketbook [gasoline was 21 cents a gallon in 1924]—hold out one thinks little of an interstate trip these days and it is often made in a few days. Witness this:”

“Tuesday of last week Mrs. J. Hall Nattin, accompanied by her sister, Mrs. Maud Johnson, of near Shreveport, and Mrs. Lizzie Adger, of Homer, then her guest, left for Boyd, Texas, 60 miles to the west of Fort Worth, that state, and about 350 miles from Bossier Parish. The made the trip in a Ford touring car, did their own driving and camped in parks at night. On the long drive there were no blow-outs, but one casing became punctured.”

“The party drove to the Texas town to visit what is said to be the largest chicken farm I the world. It embraces 350 acres, 90 acres of which are devoted exclusively to cockerels, and every chicken on the big farm is a white leg horn. We expect the owners give first attention to the production of eggs.”

“The party spent about two days at the chicken farm and we expect its three members gained considerable information about the handling of chickens. Returning home they stopped over at Roseborough Springs (Friday night) and were joined there by Mr. Nattin Saturday afternoon. They reached home Monday morning—and that’s all there is to the story, for we must not tell you that the three ladies came near having their car searched in Marshall Friday night by a revenue officer.”

To learn more about the travels of Bossier folks visit the Bossier Parish Library Historical Center.

Ann Middleton is Director of the Bossier Parish Library Historical Center. She can be reached at (318) 746-7717 or amiddlet@state.lib.la.us