The September 13, 1917 issue of The Bossier Banner touted itself as being in “a class by itself” and then proceeded to prove it.  The Bossier Banner was described on its front page under the name of the paper as “A weekly newspaper for the common people—untrameled [sic], progressive, conservative.”

“The Banner is the only country weekly newspaper we know of anywhere that has for upwards of a quarter of a century always refused all liquor advertisements.  We have lost some money on that account, but nothing in prestige.”

“The Banner makes fewer contracts with proprietary medicine concerns than any other country weekly newspaper we know of anywhere.  We have lost money on that account, but we have spared the people and have avoided the cheapened appearance that would have resulted for the paper.”

“The Banner is one of the few country weekly newspapers we know of that does not sandwich paid reading notices promiscuously between its local and personal paragraph.  We have lost some patronage on that account, but we have spared the patience of the Banner readers and at the same time greatly enhanced the appearance of the paper.”

“The Banner is one of the few country weeklies in this state that has in its office a Linotype machine, and prints its entire paper in the town of publication.  Also, it can safely be said that none other has a more painstaking make-up or a neater general appearance.”

“The Banner is the only country weekly newspaper we know of that was for more than fifty-seven years under the ownership and editorial management of one man.  It enjoys that uninterrupted record, save for its suspension during the Confederate War.  It now has a new owner, occasioned through the death of its founder, but is still in the same family.”  Writer’s note: William Henry Scanland, Sr. was the founder of the Bossier Banner.  He died in 1916 and his wife Adelaide Abney Scanland became the owner.

The praise continued: “Being well established, having a paid circulation, and enjoying such as reputation as is attained to by few country weeklies, it necessarily follows that the Banner is a good advertising medium.  It is a well-established truth that through its columns is the quick and cheap way to reach the buying public of Bossier Parish.”

Visit the Bossier Parish Library Historical Center to enjoy an exhibit featuring the history of The Bossier Banner.

Ann Middleton is Director of the Bossier Parish Library Historical Center. She can be reached at (318) 746-7717 or amiddlet@state.lib.la.us