Opinion: Signs, signs, everywhere a sign

1974

Political signs are part of the landscape during every election cycle at businesses and residences.  But it is important to know the legality of displaying a sign.

First off, if you have the courage to display a sign, good luck with that.  There are those renegades who scour the area to steal or destroy the signs of an opponent.  Or you could strain your relationship with a neighbor who supports someone else.

As for Bossier City, here is what its ordinance says:

“Political signs, which identify and urge citizens to support a particular candidate, political party, election issue, or non-commercial public cause.  Such signs shall be limited to nine square feet in size in the R-LD, R-MD, R-HD and R-E districts.  All political signs must be outside any public right-of-way. All political signs must be removed within 10 days after said election.”

lou BurnettIn Shreveport, signs placed in residential areas  shall not exceed eight square feet in area.  Those placed in other zoning districts, such as where businesses exist, shall not exceed 16 square feet.

No political sign is permitted in the public right-of-way. For example, signs should not be placed between the sidewalk and the street at your residence or at intersections.  Such signs can be removed by the city without notice.

To place a sign on a vacant lot, a form signed by the owner of the property must be on file with the Office of Public Works giving permission to the candidate before the sign is erected.

Signs confiscated by the city will be held in a storage area for a period of 30 days.  A sign can be redeemed by the owner upon payment of a $10 hauling fee and a storage fee of $5 per day for each sign that is stored.  And there may be a fine assessed as well.

All political signs must be removed within one week after the election is over from businesses and residences.

If you have questions – because we don’t understand this – we suggest you call your city councilman.

Latest voter registration figures

Voter registration statistics is a primary concern for any candidate running for office.  Here are the  latest stats for Caddo Parish and the city of Shreveport, as provided by Caddo Registrar of Voters Ernie Roberson.

Here are the stats for Bossier Parish and Bossier City:

Bossier Parish – Total registered: 69,647.  Of that total, 75% are white, 20% are black, and 5% are other races.  By party affiliation, 31% are Democrats, 42% are Republicans, and 27% are Other Party/No Party.

Bossier City – Total registered: 31,258.  Of that total, 83% are white, 13% are black, and 4% other  races.  By party affiliation, 27% are Democrats, 47% are Republicans, and 26% are Other Party/No Party.

Caddo Parish – Total registered:164,752.  Of  that total, 51% are white, 46% are black, and 3% are other races.  By party affiliation, 50% are Democrats, 27% are Republicans, and 23% are Other Party/No Party.

City of  Shreveport – Total registered: 127,813.  Of that total, 43% are white, 53% are black, and 4% are other races.

Webster Parish – Total registered: 25,732.  Of  that total, 65% are white, 37% are black, and 3% are other races.  By party affiliation, 47% are Democrats, 28% are Republicans, and 25% are Other Party/No Party.

Remember that the Legislature passed a law that bans the use of the affiliation “Independent.”

Lou Gehrig Burnett is a seasoned veteran of national and local politics. He publishes Fax-Net Update, a weekly political newsletter.