Plain Dealing supports sheriff’s K-9 program

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Lt. Raymond Barnes; K-9 Handler Joe Normand & “Ace;” students; Principal Stacy Crawford; K-9 Handler Andrew Moore; Sheriff Julian Whittington and Counselor Courtney Miller.

Submitted by Lt. Bill Davis, Bossier Sheriff’s Office

Students and faculty of Carrie Martin Elementary School in Plain Dealing showed their support for the four-legged team members of the Bossier Sheriff’s Office by donating $750 in supplies and money to Bossier Sheriff Julian Whittington and the K-9 division at a school assembly last week.     

The school held a “Dog-Gone Good Day” fundraiser in early February where the teachers brought their dogs to school along with the Bossier Sheriff’s Office K-9 team.  The event, organized by school counselor Courtney Miller, then allowed the students to donate $3 to play with the dogs, see a movie and have a snack.    

On Friday, the school presented water buckets, collars, treats, various dog supplies, $100 gift certificate and a $220 check to the K-9 team.

“It was really fun because they help keep us safe, and we’re helping the Sheriff’s Office save money,” said Adrianna Byrd, 3rd grader.

The fundraiser was part of the Helping Hearts program in which Bossier Schools support a local organization.  Stacy Crawford, principal of Carrie Martin, said they chose the Bossier Sheriff’s Office and that she was very proud of her students for their generosity.

“We appreciate the support that you provided because you were the ones who made the donations to make this possible,” Crawford said.

Sheriff Whittington discussed the important role the deputies and their canine companions play in tracking humans, such as lost children, as well as narcotics and apprehension responsibilities.

“We appreciate everyone at Carrie Martin for doing this for us, and we thank the kids and everyone who was a part of it,” Sheriff Whittington said.

For K-9 handler Andrew Moore and his Labrador retriever partner, Jessie, he says it makes his job that much more special to be honored like this.

“We’re out here to help the public, and it’s good to see the impact that the K-9 program has in the community and see the kids respond to what we’re doing,” Moore said.  He and fellow K-9 handler Joe Normand and his bloodhound partner, Ace, routinely visit the students and educate them about the harmful effects of drugs and interact with the kids on a personal level.

Fourth-grader Jaiden Kelly said he enjoys touching the dogs and helping out.  “It makes me feel happy that we get to care for the dogs and feed them,” he said.

Erin Smith, 3rd grader, has three dogs at homes named Sugar, Sissy and Jake, and she says they like to have fun with each other.  She was also happy to help with Sheriff’s Office dogs and said, “We had a party where we loved on the dogs.  Thank you for keeping us safe.”